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Recovery in the woodworking industry recorded an abrupt slowdown in the April June 2011 period, with rates closer to 2010 rather than the positive start of 2011. And there is a difference between foreign markets, more receptive and willing to invest, and an Italian industry that is static and unwilling to renovate its production equipment. This situation is also due to the average size of technology users in Italy: limited production capacity and financial resources prevent the acquisition of high-tech solutions.


Lets take a look at the results of the quarterly survey by Acimalls Studies Office, based on a representative sample of the industry.
The Italian woodworking machinery and tools industry has recorded a 0.4 percent increase in orders compared to the same period of last year. Foreign orders have grown by 15.6 percent, while domestic demand is dropping dramatically (minus 31.5 percent). In the same period, turnover expanded by 1.4 percent.
The orders book is stable at two months, while prices have increased by 1.4 percent since the beginning of the year.

According to the quality survey, 30 percent of the interviewed companies indicate a positive production trend, 40 percent stable and 30 percent decreasing. Employment is considered stationary by 77 percent of the sample and falling by the remaining 23 percent. Available stocks are stationary according to 53 percent, decreasing according to 27 percent and growing according to the remaining 20 percent.

The forecast survey offers an outlook on short-term trends: there is moderate optimism on foreign markets, but there is no sign of an imminent rally of domestic demand. 40 percent of the sample expect increasing orders from abroad, 53 percent predict a stationary situation, while the remaining 7 percent fears shrinkage (the balance is positive at plus 33). The domestic market will be shrinking according to 37 percent of the sample, stable according to 43 percent and expanding according to 20 percent (negative balance at minus 17).


The situation - said Ambrogio Delachi, Acimall President - does not suggest a consolidation of stability. The Italian wood industry is still suffering, the situation is difficult, not to say critical, and investments are postponed. Foreign markets are giving more satisfaction, as usual, despite new worries generated by the decision to cancel the Italian Foreign Trade Institute Ice. It is essential for made in Italy to have adequate support and resources, as export is a vital asset for the entire country.